BTZS FILM DEVELOPING TUBES

The downside is that the reels and drum are expensive when new so keep a look out for used ones in the usual places. I didn’t get the BTZS tubes for exactly that reason. Custom Large Format Film Development. I know you can do the stop in the light, but I would not risk it. After that everything is done in daylight. In any event you do need the motorized roller for consistent results and you still need the changing bag for film loading. I suppose the term “daylight processing” is subject to interpretation but to me any system that allows the lights to be turned on and left on once the film is loaded and ready to go is a daylight processing system.

Sorry is this is a FAQ. So how does someone in my shoes develop sheet film? Bob is incorrect in his statement that you need to be in the dark when the tubes are drained of developer and inserted in the stop bath. I can use the Jobo Expert Drum with just a plain roller? Dumping the developer and putting the tubes in stop bath with a light on is no problem at all. Phil Davis, the guy who created the tubes, says to do that, the instruction booklet I have says to do that, and most importantly I’ve done that a thousand times with 4×5 and 8×10 film, never given it a second thought and never had the slightest problem.

The only thing I don’t really like about them is that 4X5 film really sticks hard to the inside of the tubes and it takes some effort to pull them away before putting them into the fixer although I have not damaged any film. I think I will make a few tubes over the weekend and have a play as they do seem the easiest way to do small numbers of sheets with different N times. The instructions say that they are not recomended for hand processing, but I’ve got fine results consistently.

Thanks to everyone for the tremendous help. Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. I can find used parts easily, and it’s the system that will allow for the greatest upgradeability, should that ever become a factor for me.

I am in a situation similar to you so I use only a darkbag to load it. I use just a ragular jobo sheet film tank not the expert oneI can’t recall the number at the moment, but it takes a reel looking similar to a regular plastic reel, and fits 6 sheets of film.

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The thing I’ve never liked about using a Jobo drum is that it requires completely separate runs to develop film for different times. Completely streak free negs – I use Pyro Rollo for developer develpoing a non acid fixer After that everything is done in tubess. The rest of the process can be done in dim light with no problems at all. BTZS tubes– not really “daylight” processing, are they? I work inside a controlled darkroom, so this should not be a problem.

I’ve used the Jobo system only a few times while attending workshops but I had to be in complete darkness when I put the film in the drum.

Dumping the developer and putting the tubes in stop bath with a light on is no problem at all. I have the BTZS tubes and they are great to use with very even development, however, you are correct that in the film loading stage with the caps filled with developer you need total darkness. Then, I have to look for a place in Europe to get readymade Pyrokat developer, so far nil.

BTZS tubes– not really “daylight” processing, are they? | Photography Forums

Hi Bzs, I think I listed the plug in one of the other update articles – but here is what I am talking about – Amazon. Bob is incorrect in his statement that you need to be in the dark when the tubes are drained of developer and inserted in the stop bath.

The HP Combi Plan processing tank allow strue daylight processin of 4×5 sheet film. Bob, take my word for it, it’s no risk at all. So how does someone in my shoes develop sheet film?

No problems with anything over about 45 rpm. It does take up a fair amount of room and will need storing between sessions as you don’t have a darkroom. You must log in or sign up to reply here. I would not call the tubes a daylight process as a tank, but you can turn the lights during development and scratching the film is mimimized.

Now, what is the clean out plug for, it’s not mentioned in your article? Frankly, I would not describe this as a “daylight” method at all Your name or email address: I used my Jobo 8×10 expert drum as a place to start testing, but based on the inability to get the developer into the tank fast enough, I knew I needed a new approach if I was going to get the types of results that I need for my work.

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While the latter might be the case, I just learned that it doesn’t truly allow for daylight operation– you have to fill the tubes with developer in complete darkness. My plan is to build some sort of a stand to place the tubes in while they are in the semi-stand portion of the development process. I learned about this approach from Tim Jones.

BTZS tubes– not really “daylight” processing, are they?

OR for feveloping completely even processing use a Jobo Expert drum – load in your bag, process in daylight – either by rolling it on an inexpensive Jobo roller or by finding an old Chromega or Beseler roller base, unidirectional if possible.

These tubes could be used for any number of approaches to develop large format black and white sheet film. I’m dveloping that you can’t find a place that at night you can darken sufficiently for the three or four minutes it takes to put film in the tubes and cap the tubes.

Jobo recommend using the high speed on the CPE2 for film processing i. I want a better representation of mid-tones in my prints and this is something that is not inherently easy to do. Cheers, Rolf No comments posted. David, you are probably right about the cause of mottling: For a budget alternative which will work for you, try a unicolor drum or two and roller base.

I also use my Jobo for RA-4 color print development. A darkcloth and gaffer tape will block out a small window and towels and more black tape will block a door. I second the idea for the – no problems at all, once I realized to really fill the tank all the way up with chemicals. When I compared the negatives developed with D 1: The downside is that the reels and drum are expensive when new so keep a look out for used ones in the usual places.

Follow the printed numbers on the side of the tank – I learned that the hard way! The is the magnet base and accepts all system components. Fine Art Printmaking Service.